Frequently Asked Questions



 v  General FAQs

Q.
How much charging time is available per day, either with shore power or generator power?
A.
A 20 amp unit will average 20 amps per hour. Twelve hours of charging time will equal near 240 amperages returned to battery.
Q.
How many batteries or battery banks are to be charged?
A.
A bank is several batteries harnessed together and treated as if they were a single, larger battery. Your charger will require one output per bank. Chargers often have a number of outputs, some which need not be used. Some have 1 or 2, most have 3 or more units.
Q.
What is the type, usage and total amp hour capacity of your batteries? (Examples: #1-one 205 amp 8D for engine start, #2-one 205 amp 8D for engine start, #3-four 250 amp 6 volt golf cart-house, #4-one 85 amp gel cell for generator start)
A.
This figure is usually expressed as a “20-hour rating.” Fast or quick chargers should not exceed 20% of this rating for normal batteries or 30% for golf cart or specialty batteries.
Q.
What is your average hourly DC load (24 hours)? (Example: Fridge runs for 20 minutes out of every hour at 12 amps = four amps average load.)
A.
This is the total of all equipment loads: lighting + refrigeration + pumps + motors, etc. Intermittent loads, such as 12V DC refrigerators which cycle on and off, should be averaged out over their duty cycle.
Q.
How quickly do you need to recharge and to what percent of full charge – 80% or 100%?
A.
Batteries need to be kept fully charged (to 80% is okay for two or three weeks of cruising). Normal alternators and battery chargers reach 70% of full charge fairly quickly, but take longer than “fast” chargers to charge that last 30%. The new technology multistep chargers will recharge your batteries 100%.
Q.
What type of batteries – flooded, lead/acid, gel, agm, etc.?
A.
Chargers are field adjustable to meet manufacturer’s specs, or Professional Mariner will customize a unit for your requirements.

 v   Alternator / Regulator FAQs

Q.
How do I wire up the alternator regulator?
A.
The wiring of the regulator will depend on what application you are using (either a split charge diode/relay or a rotary switch). Please see the user manual that came with your regulator for proper wiring instructions.
Q.
My alternator regulator is not working?
A.
If you see any lights lit up on the regulator that you do not understand then you should refer to the user manual for the descriptions of what the lights mean and what you can do to resolve them.

 v   Battery FAQs

Q.
What are the different types of batteries?
A.
Here are the different types of batteries you can purchase:

Lead-acid batteries

Requires maintenance.

Liquid electrolyte that needs to be periodically checked and filled with distilled water (as needed). Has to be mounted upright (will leak through caps if mounted in any other position).
Considered hazardous material.
AGM absorbed glass-mat batteries

Maintenance-free.

Sealed battery that has all of its electrolyte absorbed in fiberglass separators consisting of a sponge-like mass of matted glass fibers. Operates under pressure to force the hydrogen and oxygen gases produced during charging to recombine into water, eliminating the need to periodically add water to the battery. Spill-proof, leak-proof, can be mounted in any position and can be shipped via regular freight carriers.
Gel-cell batteries

Maintenance-free.

Sealed battery that uses gelled electrolyte technology. Operates under pressure to force the hydrogen and oxygen gases produced during charging to recombine into water, eliminating the need to periodically add water to the battery.
Spill-proof, leak-proof, can be mounted in any position and can be shipped via regular freight carriers.
Q.
What are the different sizes of batteries?
A.
These are the different size batteries you
can get:

Group 24
Group 27
Group 31
Group 4D
Group 8D

(Group size is determined by dimensions and amp hour capacity.)

Q. What are some of the most common battery manufacturers?
A. Here is a list of the most common battery manufacturers:

DieHard Batteries
EastPenn-Deka Batteries
Exide Batteries
Everstart Batteries
Lifeline Batteries
Optima Batteries
Trojan Batteries
Q. What types of batteries can your chargers handle?
A. You can use any of the above battery types on our chargers. Our chargers are factory set for lead-acid batteries. The settings depend on the type of charger (different models may have different settings), but most of our chargers have a lead-acid and a gel-cell setting. AGM batteries will charge at the lead-acid setting (NOT the gel setting).

 v   Battery Charger FAQs

Q.
Can my 12 volt charger charge my 24-volt or 36-volt battery system?
A.
Our waterproof chargers are designed to charge 12-volt batteries within a 12/24/36 volt system. If you have a Dry Mounted battery charger (ProTech, Flyback, Promatic) then you would need a 24-volt charger for a 24-volt system or a 36-volt charger for a 36-volt system. A 12-volt non-waterproof charger cannot charge a 24-volt or 36-volt system…….the charger has separate positive terminals but only one common negative terminal (so the battery banks are not isolated from each other).
Q.
Can I connect the charger to only one battery? What do I do with the unused terminals?
A.
On a Dry Mount charger, you will need to jumper the unused positive terminals to one of the positive terminals that you are using so that the charger will “read” a battery on each lead.
Q. Where can I mount the charger?
A. Make sure you have adequate ventilation for cooling of the charger, but these chargers are not made to get wet and it will Void the warranty.
Q. My charger is tripping my GFCI circuit breaker on my outside outlet?
A. All chargers that use this technology to charge batteries bleed a little voltage, which should be below the GFCI trip point. Test the charger on a non-GFCI outlet (inside the house) and see if the charger works. If it works, then most likely something is wrong with the GFCI outlet. If it does not work on an inside outlet, then there is something wrong with the charger.
Q. Can my charger be left on for an extended period of time?
A. The newer 3-step chargers have a float mode (3rd step) which maintains the batteries at 13.3 volts (for lead-acid batteries) and 13.8 volts (for gel-cell batteries). As long as the batteries are in good condition and you maintain your water levels inside the batteries periodically (for lead-acid batteries), then you can leave the charger on between fishing, boating trips, etc.
Q. What charger setting do I have to use for AGM batteries?
A. AGM batteries can charge at the lead-acid setting on our battery chargers. Our chargers are factory set for lead-acid so you do not have to make any changes to the charger.
Q. Can I charge a lead-acid battery and a gel-cell battery together?
A. Our chargers charge and float lead-acid batteries at a different voltage than gel-cell batteries. You should not mix battery types because you are going to compromise a battery if you charge it at the wrong setting.
Q. What is the difference between the older Ferro-Resonant chargers and the newer 3-step chargers?
A. The older Ferro-resonant chargers were constant volt chargers that put out 13.8 volts. They did not charge at a high voltage and then step down the voltage for a maintenance mode. They are much bigger and heavier and most often louder.
Q. How long will it take to charge my batteries?
A. The following equation will give you a good idea of how long it will take to charge batteries.

Total Amp Hour capacity of the batteries
————————————————
Total amperage output of charger

= Total Hours To Charge Batteries

Example: 100 amp hour battery / 10 amp charger = 10 hours

If you drain your battery half-way (50%) then you would need to put 50 amps back into it. Based on the above equation it would take you 5 hours to charge the battery.

If you have more than one battery, you will have to add up the amp hour capacity of all the batteries and then divide by the total amp output of charger to get charge time.

 v  Waterproof Battery Charger FAQs

Q.
How hot is my charger supposed to get?
A.
If it is a waterproof charger (ProTournament, ProSport, ProSport Generation 2, XPS or ProMite), it does not have external fans on it. It dissipates heat through the casing, so it does get warm to the touch. Most often we describe temperature as: you can touch the charger, but you would not want to carry it across the room.
Q.
How do I wire the charger to my 24-volt or 36-volt battery system?
A.
Our waterproof chargers are designed to charge 12-volt batteries within a 12/24/36 volt system. If you have a waterproof battery charger (ProTournament, ProSport, ProSport Generation 2, BassMaster, ProMite or XPS) and you want to connect it to either a 24-volt or 36-volt system, just connect one set of leads (positive and negative) to each battery in the system (the leads are fully isolated from each other). You do not have to disconnect the jumper that connects the positive from one battery to the negative of another battery. The same goes for batteries in a 12-volt system…..just put one set of leads (positive and negative) on each battery. So a 2 bank charger charges 2 batteries, and a 3 bank charger charges 3 batteries.
Q. Can I connect the charger to only one battery? What do I do with the unused leads or terminals?
A. If you are using a waterproof charger and want to charge 1 battery on a 2 bank charger, you will need to connect both leads on that one battery. If you are charging 1 or 2 batteries with a 3 bank charger, you will need to connect all the leads on the 1 or 2 batteries. At no time should the charger be run without all the leads being connected to a battery(s).
Q. Where can I mount the charger?
A. Make sure you have adequate ventilation for cooling when charging. It can be mounted in any direction; it can even be mounted on the underside of a hatch, or any wall that you have enough room (as long as it is mounted as far as possible from the batteries or fuel tank). Don’t mount them on carpets—if you have no other location, mount it on either a board or with some kind of spacers to lift the charger off of the carpeted area. If the charger is mounted in an enclosed space it is best to open a hatch during the first stage of charging.
Q. My charger is tripping my GFCI circuit breaker on my outside outlet?
A. All chargers that use this technology to charge batteries bleed a little voltage on the ground, which should be below the GFCI trip point. Test the charger on a non-GFCI outlet (inside the house) and see if the charger works. If it works, then most likely something is wrong with the GFCI outlet. If it does not work on an inside outlet, then there is something wrong with the charger.
Q. Can my charger be left on for an extended period of time?
A. The newer 3-step chargers have a float mode (3rd step) which maintains the batteries at 13.3 volts (for lead-acid batteries) and 13.8 volts (for gel-cell batteries). As long as the batteries are in good condition and you maintain your water levels inside the batteries periodically (for lead-acid batteries), then you can leave the charger on between fishing, boating trips, etc.
Q. What charger setting do I have to use for AGM batteries?
A. Most AGM batteries can charge at the lead-acid setting on a battery charger. Our chargers are factory set for lead-acid so you do not have to make any changes to the charger.
Q. Can I charge a lead-acid battery and a gel-cell battery together?
A. Our chargers charge and float lead-acid batteries at a different voltage than gel-cell batteries. You should not mix battery types because you are going to compromise a battery if you charge it at the wrong setting.
Q. What does it mean if I have a blinking light?
A. If you are getting blinking lights there are two things that could be going on.1. There could be a problem with your charger.2. There could be a problem with your batterie(s) (even if they are new).The first thing to check is to see that the polarity (negative and positive) has not been reversed. If they are set up correct, then disconnect the leads from the batteries and with the end of the leads not touching anything turn the charger on. You should get a solid green light and the output of the charger should be 13.3 volts. If the light(s) still blinks then there is a problem with the charger. If you get a solid green light the next step is to isolate each of the batteries, by doubling up the leads on one of the batteries. Repeat this until you have isolated each of the batteries. If it blinks on all combinations of the batteries, then there is a problem with the charger. If it blinks on one of the batteries, then that battery is the problem.

 v   Battery Isolator FAQs

Q.
Do I need a Return Goods Authorization number (RGA #) to return my isolator?
A.
Only if you are sending in an isolator for a dealer, distributor or marina that requires one. If you purchased one as an outright sale through one of the above, you don’t need one, but are asked to call before returning it to us to confirm that there is a problem with it and to get proper returning instructions.
Q. What is an isolator used for?
A. They are solid state devices which allow electrical current to flow in one directly only. This allows one alternator to be connected to multiple battery banks without fear of fully charged batteries discharging into undercharged batteries.
Q. How do I know which isolator I need?
A. It all depends on the number of alternators you have, the amperage output of the alternator(s), and the number of batteries that you are wiring to.NOTE: Professional Mariner Isolators are not recommended for use with the following alternators: Niehoff; Delco 10 SI type 116, 25 SI or 30 SI series; Hitachi LR 135-31 type, 110 or 106 type; Leece Neville JB series; or any self exciting style alternator.
Q. How do I wire up the isolator?
A. ANSWER: The isolator is wired between the alternator and the batteries. You would have either one or two input terminals that connect from the alternator and either two or three output terminals that go to the batteries.
Q. There is no output voltage on my isolator?
A. You can check to see if the isolator is working with a digital multi-meter set on “DIODE CHECK” mode. Put the red lead on the alternator input terminal and the black lead on one of the battery output terminals…..you should get a reading around .4 on most meters. Then reverse the leads and you should get a reading of infinity. Perform this procedure from all of your alternator input terminals to all of your battery output terminals. If you get a different reading with the red lead on a battery terminal then the isolator is defective.

 v  Corrosion Control FAQs

Q.
Do I need a Return Goods Authorization number (RGA #) to return my product?
A.
Only if you are sending in a product for a dealer, distributor or marina that requires one. If you purchased one as an outright sale through one of the above, you don’t need one, but are asked to call before returning it to us to confirm that there is a problem with it and to get proper returning instructions.
Q. How do I test my Galvanic Isolator?
A. With a multi-meter in DIODE CHECK mode put the red lead on one of the terminals and the black lead on the other terminal. Record the reading. Reverse the red and black leads and record that reading. The two readings should be the same number (+/ – 10).
Q. What is the difference between the ProSafe Deluxe and the ProSafe 1 units?
A.
PROSAFE DELUXE
PROSAFE 1
Automatically tests every 6 hours. Automatically tests every 3 hours.
Performs a self-test of its own electronics.
LEDs:
Ground Wire
(Normal & Fail)
Reverse Polarity
(green and red)
Galvanic Isolator
(Normal & Fail)
Ground Wire
(green and red)
Bonding System Protection
(Normal & Fail)
Galvanic Isolator
(green and red)
General:
During automatic tests of the system the audible alarm is disabled so as not to be an inconvenience during sleeping hours. Less Expensive than ProSafe Deluxe
Smaller than ProSafe Deluxe
Easier to install than ProSafe Deluxe
Q. Why is the Ground Wire red light is on?
A. The Ground Wire (green wire) is not connected to the shore properly. The fault can be caused by the green wire being open or disconnected, by a bad connection at the Galvanic Isolator, shore cord plug, dock plug, or even the metal tip of the plug itself not making good contact. It can also be caused by the ground wire not being connected to the neutral back on the dock (a requirement under the National Electrical Code).
Q. What is the difference between an Analog Portable Corrosion Test Meter and a good multi-meter for corrosion readings?
A. A digital meter will have a more accurate reading. Also, if you are checking corrosion voltage levels in fresh water you will need to use a digital meter. An analog meter will give you a very low reading (if any at all) in fresh water.
Q. Where can I mount my Thru Hull Cell in the boat and how do I maintain it?
A. The Thru Hull Cell can be mounted anywhere below water level. You should never paint a Thru Hull Cell. You can keep it clean from growth using a soft brush.
Q. What type of voltage does the Corrosion Test Meters read?
A. The Corrosion Test Meters read DC millivolts.
Q. What is the correct wire size to use in a bonding system?
A. The recommended wire size to use in a bonding system is # 6 gauge GREEN wire.
Q. What is a bonded system?
A. A bonded system is when you connect all your metals in the boat (that are exposed to water) to each other and then to a sacrificial anode (like a piece of zinc). The sacrificial metal will erode protecting the boat metal that is bonded to it.If a boat is not bonded and you took readings on all the underwater metals with a “Corrosion Test Meter” the readings will be slightly different from each other. If a boat is bonded then the readings should be exactly the same.
Q. What are the definitions to some of the most commonly used terms for corrosion control?
A. Here is a list of the most commonly used corrosion terms:

Anode The more active (less Noble – higher in voltage) metal or area of metal in an electrolyte that protects the cathodic (less active — more Noble) metal or area by sacrificing itself.
Cathode The more Noble, less active area or metal in an electrolyte that is protected as the anode gives off current.
Electrolysis Chemical and/or electromechanical changes in a solution due to the passage of an electrical current. Some boaters use this term incorrectly to mean galvanic corrosion or stray current corrosion.
Galvanic Corrosion Corrosion resulting from electric current flow between dissimilar metals or dissimilar surfaces on one metal in contact with the same electrolyte. This same natural phenomenon we see every day in flashlight batteries, automotive batteries, electroplating etc.
Pitting Tiny areas where the protective film has broken allowing corrosion to take place. Stainless steel is very susceptible to pitting.
Sacrificial Anode The metal attached to a bonding system that is intentionally a higher voltage than the rest of the metal in the system so that this metal is sacrificial rather than the highest voltage boat metals.
Shaft Brush A device to connect the revolving shaft electrically to the bonding system.
Stray Current Corrosion Similar to galvanic corrosion in that the more active areas lose material to the less active areas of metals in an electrolyte but caused by an outside source rather than spontaneously. The boat’s DC system or AC system, the dock’s AC system, or other boats on the dock could be the source of stray current.
Zinc Pad A mounting device to make zinc replacement easier and to insulate the zinc and current flow from the wooden or painted hull.
A mounting can be made by insulating threaded rods with heatshrink to the thickness of the hull and separating the nuts from the hull with non-current carrying washers (plastic, phenolic, etc.) needed on wood hulls and metal hulls that need separate systems.
Q. What is bonding and why is it necessary?
A. Bonding, in effect, makes all the immersed metals into one piece of metal. The voltage throughout the bonding system will be the same and will average out depending on the size and voltage of each metal. One piece of zinc, of the appropriate size, attached to the bonding system as the sacrificial anode, will protect all the bonded metal as long as the zinc keeps the needle of the corrosion test meter in the green section.Bonding provides a low-resistance electrical path between metals in contact with water. This path protects against self-generated galvanic corrosion, helpful against other types of corrosion, and also acts as a radio ground.It is recommended that a #6 gauge wire with green insulation on it (to designate its purpose) be used for the bonding system.
Q. What are the different types of corrosion control systems that you can use on your boat?
A.
Advantages
Disadvantages
(A) BONDED SYSTEM WITH ZINC
Protects against Galvanic Corrosion.
Adds to lightning protection and radio ground.
No control over zinc output.
Stray current corrosion can not be tested or observed.
Wide range of zinc voltages.
Decreased voltage when boat is moving.
Normal voltage can destroy wood hulls.
(B) BONDED SYSTEM WITH ZINC AND MANUAL ZINC CONTROLLER
Protects against Galvanic Corrosion and wood damage.
Adds to lightning protection and radio ground.
Zinc can be controlled (with aid of portable test meter).
Daily zinc voltage or stray current corrosion can not be tested or observed.
Decreased voltage when boat is moving.
(C) BONDED SYSTEM WITH ZINC AND MANUAL CONTROLLER WITH BUILT-IN CORROSION TEST METER
Protects against Galvanic Corrosion.
Adds to lightning protection and radio ground.
Zinc output and voltage can be controlled.
Stray current corrosion can be tested and observed.
None – The boat captain must monitor the system and a slight adjustment of the control knob on the meter once or twice a month will keep protection at exact levels.
(D) BONDED SYSTEM WITH ZINC AND AUTOMATIC ZINC CONTROLLER
Protects against Galvanic Corrosion.
Zinc output voltage automatically controlled.
Stray current corrosion can be tested and observed.
Increased current when boat is moving.
Does not automatically protect against stray current corrosion – meter must be observed.
More complex.
More expensive.
Can cover up beginning of problems or small stray currents.
(E) IMPRESSED CURRENT SYSTEM
All of zinc system advantages plus exact output voltages and some stray current corrosion protection. Does not automatically protect against all stray current corrosion (meter must be observed).
High initial equipment and installation cost and more complicated to repair.
Bonded fittings must be very well done and checked often.
System failure could destroy metal.
The recommended system would be (C). The Corrosion Controller test meter should be viewed each time one goes on board. A simple adjustment of the corrosion control knob will adjust protection up or down and should not vary substantially over several weeks. Voltage and current can change slightly with the salinity, temperature and flow of the electrolyte (seawater). Stray current corrosion can strike at any time through several sources including your DC system, your AC system, the dock’s AC system and other boats on your dock and a daily check is warranted.
Q. Should Zincs or Thru Hull Sensors be painted?
A. You should not paint Zincs or Thru Hull Sensors on your boat. It can affect the operation of the components from working properly.
Q. What prevents a particular metal on a boat from eroding faster than another metal?
A. A lower voltage metal will last forever if its normal freely eroding voltage is raised by 225 to 250 millivolts. If you have two metals connected together the one that is more active (less Noble) will deteriorate while protecting the metal that is least active (more Noble).
Q. Why do I need a Galvanic Isolator on my boat?
A. When the dock shore cord green wire is attached to your bonding system and another boat in the area has an AC green wire to bonding connection, you have formed a battery. Your boat will lose zinc towards the dock and to all other lower bonding system voltage boats in the general area that have the AC green wire attached to their bonding systems.A Galvanic Isolator (also known as a Zinc Saver) installed between the AC shore cord green wire and your DC bonding system stops zinc loss to other boats and to the dock while maintaining AC safety ground protection.

 v   Inverter FAQs

Q.
Do I need a Return Goods Authorization number (RGA #) to return my inverter?
A.
Only if you are sending in an inverter for a dealer, distributor or marina that requires one. If you purchased one as an outright sale through one of the above, you don’t need one, but are asked to call before returning it to us to confirm that there is a problem with it and to get proper returning instructions.
Q. How do I know which inverter I need?
A. Add up all the wattage from all of your accessories that you will be operating to determine the proper size inverter. Also determine if you need a 12-volt or 24-volt inverter.
Q. How do I wire up the inverter?
A. There are positive and negative battery connections on one end of the inverter and A/C outlets on the other end (depending on model).
Q. Where can I mount the inverter?
A. Always mount the inverter in an environment which is:
1) Well ventilated
2) Not exposed to direct sunlight or heat source
3) Out of reach from children
4) Away from water, moisture, oil or grease
5) Away from any flammable substance
Q. My inverter doesn’t seem to be working?
A. There are several reasons why the inverter may not be working.

Poor Contact
Clean contact parts thoroughly.
Outlet Receptacle has no power
Check blade fuse inside—replace if necessary with equivalent size.
Check receptacle wiring.
Overload caused AC outlet to reduce power
Reduce the wattage of your load (below the wattage of the inverter).
DC plug fuse is blown
Replace the fuse inside the DC plug with equivalent size fuse.
Thermal caused AC outlet to reduce power
Under heavy loads for extended periods of time the inverter will reduce output to prevent damage from excess heat. If this happens proceed as follows:
(A) Switch off the power switch of the inverter.
(B) Decrease load of the inverter; i.e. disconnect some of the appliances or wait until the inverter cools down.
(C) Switch on the power switch of the inverter.
Low battery shutdown
Recharge your batteries and resume operation.

Online Catalog